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April Breathwork Series

 

Spring cleansing breathing practices include practices that help us to energize (overcome lethargy), to stimulate our mental focus, to alleviate internal pressure (aka anxiety), and to cleanse the subtle body. Download the Breathwork Series to begin or enhance your practice.

 

Ayurvedic Veggie Soup

 

Food and spices are medicinal. They have an influence on our digestive and immune systems. For example, asparagus has a diuretic function that helps the cleansing process by activating the functions of the liver and kidneys that eliminate the toxins. It is also a very good source of fiber, folate, vitamins A, C, E and K, as well as chromium, a trace mineral that enhances the ability of insulin to transport glucose from the bloodstream into cells.

That’s good news if you’re watching your blood sugar.  Cabbage can raise levels of beta-carotene, lutein, and other heart-protective antioxidants. Celery has high water content — almost 95 percent — plus generous amounts of soluble and insoluble fiber. All of those support a healthy digestive tract and keep you regular.

 

Spring Cleanse Your Mind: Meditation Tips

 

In Hunger, Hope & Healing, we follow the principles of Yoga and
Ayurveda. When it comes to digestion and health, in Ayurveda, we
don’t only consider food, we also recognize that our thoughts and
emotions influence our digestion and our overall health. Download our Meditation Tips below.

 

April Ayurvedic Recipe: Spicy Okra

 

In Ayurveda we say that okra is “OJAS” building like most plants in the mallow family. It is considered a tri-doshic food which means it is good for all 3 doshas.

Okra is Sattvic in nature, therefore, light and vitalizing. It is also an alkalizing vegetable. It has multiple nutrients: beta carotene, calcium, insoluble fiber, iron, magnesium, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and Vitamin K. Okra energizes, is nutritive, and provides demulcent qualities that can benefit our lungs and sinuses in the Winter to Spring transition. Okra also has a natural laxative quality and helps to soothe the gastro-intestinal track.

 

 

April Ayurvedic Recipe: Palak Paneer

In the Spring, we are gifted with spicy, bitter greens such as arugula, mustard greens, dandelion greens, kale, and radish. These foods act on us in two ways: they improve our blood and exfoliate our digestive system. 

When we have healthier blood, it means that the nutrients that rely on transportation through our circulation can get where they are meant to go more easily.  When our digestion is clean, clear and working optimally, our inner vitality will match the outer vitality we see surging through nature. Download this delicious recipe and enjoy!

Spring Cleansing With Food

Eating seasonally is the most intuitive diet you can practice because it puts us into a direct relationship with nature and ourselves. This leads to a more intimate and intuitive relationship with our body and food.

As the tender vegetable sprouts push up from the earth, or when first blossoms appear on fruit trees, it’s like getting a message from nature: This is your seasonal medicine! This is your nourishment.

Healthy Boundaries, Healthy Body – Guidelines to Self-Care

Family and work–they help us feel a sense of purpose, belonging and fulfillment.  Yet, for those of us struggling with food addiction, body image or emotional eating, the obligations of work and family become overwhelming can cause us to feel like we’re falling apart.

​​​​​​​Family and food can be triggers, as can the messages that surround our responsibilities in society, which are often unhelpful, even provocative. Be a good mother, a good wife, a good daughter.  You’re abandoning your child if you work.  You’re indulgent if you don’t work.  You have to take care of your parents as they age.  You’re ungrateful and selfish if you don’t.

Putting everyone else’s needs ahead of our own can make us feel depleted and pulled in too many directions.  The anxiety this pull creates can express itself in our relationship to food.  ​​​​​​​

I have put together these guidelines to help you:

  • Create a plan for self-care
  • Check in with yourself and your needs
  • Prevent situations where blood sugar and cravings take control
  • Set and keep personal boundaries
  • Maintain your health and well-being throughout the year

These guidelines are to help you commit to your personal boundaries, self-care and your well-being.

Getting Out of the Trance of Diet Culture Mentality

If you’ve been lured into diet culture one too many times, and you suspect there are reasons why it seduces you, try reading and applying these guidelines.

Guidelines for Holiday Gatherings

Holidays can be a time of joy and celebration, a time for family, friends and food.  Holiday gatherings seem to bring people together. Yet for those of us struggling with food addiction, body image or emotional eating, these same gatherings can cause us to feel like we’re falling apart.

​​​​​​​Family and food can be triggers, as can the messages that surround the holidays, which are often unhelpful, even provocative. (This counter-productive messaging is also common with weddings, family reunions, and other social events.)

Some of the most turbulent times in recovery occur during the holiday season —a mass-cultural phenomenon of overindulgence, disregard for seasonal health, and splurging with plans for atonement, a.k.a. binge now, diet later.​​​​​​​

I have put together these guidelines to help you:

  • Create a plan for self-care
  • Check in with yourself and your needs before and during events
  • Prevent situations where blood sugar and cravings take control
  • Set and keep personal boundaries
  • Maintain your health and well-being through the challenges of the holidays

This guide is designed so you can commit to yourself now, during the holidays, and not wait for New Year’s Day (or any other “special occasion day”) to care for yourself wisely and well.

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